GASTRIC BYPASS QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

The following Gastric Bypass questions are asked by real people like you. The answers are provided by board-certified doctors or qualified medical providers who meet our exacting standards.

Gastric bypass also referred to as Roux-en-Y, is a surgical procedure to cut across the top of your stomach and seal it off from the rest of the stomach. The size of this pouch is as much as a walnut, so it can’t hold much food and drink. Therefore, the absorption of nutrients decreases.

No, gastric bypass surgery is not reversible.

Gastric bypass also referred to as Roux-en-Y, is a surgical procedure to cut across the top of your stomach and seal it off from the rest of the stomach.

Yes, this procedure is performed under general anaesthesia.

There are two components to the procedure. First, a small stomach pouch, approximately one ounce or 30 millilitres in volume, is created by dividing the top of the stomach from the rest of the stomach. Next, the first portion of the small intestine is divided, and the bottom end of the divided small intestine is brought up and connected to the newly created small stomach pouch. The procedure is completed by connecting the top portion of the divided small intestine to the small intestine further down so that the stomach acids and digestive enzymes from the bypassed stomach and first portion of the small intestine will eventually mix with the food.

The gastric bypass works by several mechanisms. First, similar to most bariatric procedures, the newly created stomach pouch is considerably smaller and facilitates significantly smaller meals, which translates into fewer calories consumed. Additionally, because there is less digestion of food by the smaller stomach pouch, and there is a segment of the small intestine that would normally absorb calories as well as nutrients that no longer has food going through it, there is probably to some degree less absorption of calories and nutrients.

Most importantly, the rerouting of the food stream produces changes in gut hormones that promote satiety, suppress hunger, and reverse one of the primary mechanisms by which obesity induces type 2 diabetes.

The gastric bypass works by several mechanisms. First, similar to most bariatric procedures, the newly created stomach pouch is considerably smaller and facilitates significantly smaller meals, which translates into fewer calories consumed. Additionally, because there is less digestion of food by the smaller stomach pouch, and there is a segment of the small intestine that would normally absorb calories as well as nutrients that no longer has food going through it, there is probably to some degree less absorption of calories and nutrients.

Before you go through any weight loss surgery, you should make sure you are qualified for that. You will receive an instruction on preparation for the specific type of bariatric surgery. You need to give some lab tests and exams before the surgery. Your surgeon gives you some food and drink diet and the medications you can take. You should stop smoking and start some physical activities. 

Gastric bypass also referred as bariatric and metabolic surgery helps you lower the risk of medical problems related to obesity such as heart disease and stroke, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, high blood pressure, sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes. These procedures change the metabolism and improve the ability of the body to achieve a healthy weight.

Bariatric or weight loss surgery is a routine and popular surgery in Iran. According to the statics, more than 7000 people have weight loss surgery annually in Iran.

    • A significant long-term weight loss (60 to 80 percent excess weight loss)
    • Restricting the amount of food consumed
    • Leading to conditions that increase energy expenditure
    • Producing favourable changes in gut hormones that reduce appetite and enhance satiety
    • Maintenance of >50% excess weight loss

Your surgeon will instruct you a specific diet for a few weeks, as you are not allowed to eat for couple of days after bariatric surgery. So your stomach and digestive system can rest and heal. There are many restrictions and limits on what you can eat and the portion of meals. The diet begins with liquids and after a few days, you can have pureed and very soft foods and eventually allow to eat regular foods.

    • A more complex operation technically than the AGB or LSG and potentially could result in greater complication rates
    • Causing long-term vitamin/mineral deficiencies particularly deficits in vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate
    • A longer hospital-stay than the AGB
    • Adhere to dietary recommendations, lifelong vitamin/mineral supplementation, and follow-up compliance
    • A more complex operation technically than the AGB or LSG and potentially could result in greater complication rates
    • Causing long-term vitamin/mineral deficiencies particularly deficits in vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate
    • A longer hospital-stay than the AGB
    • Adhere to dietary recommendations, lifelong vitamin/mineral supplementation, and follow-up compliance

Like any major surgery, weight loss surgery (bariatric surgery) has some potential health risks including:

    • Excessive bleeding
    • Infection
    • Adverse reactions to anesthesia
    • Blood clots
    • Lung or breathing problems
    • Leaks in your gastrointestinal system
    • Death (rare)

advantages

    • A significant long-term weight loss (60 to 80 percent excess weight loss)
    • Restricting the amount of food consumed
    • Leading to conditions that increase energy expenditure
    • Producing favourable changes in gut hormones that reduce appetite and enhance satiety
    • Maintenance of >50% excess weight loss

Disadvantages

    • A more complex operation technically than the AGB or LSG and potentially could result in greater complication rates
    • Causing long-term vitamin/mineral deficiencies particularly deficits in vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate
    • A longer hospital stays than the AGB
    • Adhere to dietary recommendations, lifelong vitamin/mineral supplementation, and follow-up compliance

There are some rare long-term risks and complications of bariatric surgery which vary depending on the type of surgery. You should discuss with your surgeon about the risks and complications before going through the procedure.

    • Bowel obstruction
    • Dumping syndrome, which leads to diarrhea, flushing, lightheadedness, nausea or vomiting
    • Gallstones
    • Hernias
    • hypoglycemia (Low blood sugar)
    • Malnutrition
    • Ulcers
    • Vomiting
    • Acid reflux
    • The need for a second, or revision, surgery or procedure
    • Death (rare)

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