Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

The following Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch questions is asked by real people like you. The answers are provided by board-certified doctors or qualified medical providers who meet our exacting standards.

Biliopancreatic diversion is a type of loss weight surgery combination of two major steps in which the first step involves a sleeve gastrectomy and the second surgery involves connecting the end portion of the intestine to the duodenum near the stomach (duodenal switch and biliopancreatic diversion), bypassing the majority of the intestine. This surgery is less common as it has more risks including malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. So, it is recommended for people with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 50.

This procedure is a two steps surgery that begins with a sleeve gastrectomy to remove a large part of the stomach.

This procedure is a two steps surgery that begins with a sleeve gastrectomy to remove a large part of the stomach. The valve is left along with the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Then, the middle section of the intestine will be closed off and the last part of the duodenum will be attached to the first part. This is the duodenal switch. The separated section of the intestine isn’t removed from the body. Instead, it’s reattached to the end of the intestine, allowing bile and pancreatic digestive juices to flow into this part of the intestine. This is the biliopancreatic diversion.

As a result of these changes, food bypasses most of the small intestine, limiting the absorption of calories and nutrients. This, together with the smaller size of the stomach, leads to weight loss.

    • Resulting in greater weight loss rather than RYGB, LSG or AGB
    • Allowing patients to eat near “normal” portion of meals
    • Reducing the absorption of fat by 70 percent or more
    • Causing favourable changes in gut hormones to reduce appetite and improve satiety
    • The most effective against diabetes compared to RYGB, LSG, and AGB
    • Longer hospital-stay than the AGB or LSG
    • Greater potential to cause protein deficiencies and long-term deficiencies in a number of vitamin and minerals, i.e., iron, calcium, zinc, fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin D
    • Compliance with follow-up visits and care and strict adherence to dietary and vitamin supplementation guidelines are critical to avoid serious complications from protein and certain vitamin deficiencies.

advantages

    • Resulting in greater weight loss rather than RYGB, LSG or AGB
    • Allowing patients to eat near “normal” portion of meals
    • Reducing the absorption of fat by 70 percent or more
    • Causing favourable changes in gut hormones to reduce appetite and improve satiety
    • The most effective against diabetes compared to RYGB, LSG, and AGB

Disadvantages

    • Longer hospital-stay than the AGB or LSG
    • Greater potential to cause protein deficiencies and long-term deficiencies in a number of vitamin and minerals, i.e., iron, calcium, zinc, fat-soluble vitamins such as vitamin D
    • Compliance with follow-up visits and care and strict adherence to dietary and vitamin supplementation guidelines are critical to avoid serious complications from protein and certain vitamin deficiencies.

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